ANZAC day

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Splod
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ANZAC day

Post by Splod » Sun Apr 25, 2010 3:54 pm

Well, my day is just winding to a close now... Far too much end of army provided Meat and beer rations for me to stay awake much longer.
Anyone else take part in a march this ANZAC day?
How did the rest of you fare today?
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Re: ANZAC day

Post by Admin Fella » Sun Apr 25, 2010 5:42 pm

I took the family into Brisbane for the main parade. A nice, but sad affair for me as i remembered how many WWI and WWII verterans there were (my earliest memories were the mid 80's playing in a cadet bad and there seemed to be sooo many of them then) compared to the few now around. I keep thinking how ANZAC day was based around the WWI and WWII guys and hope the spirit can keep going when they are no longer marching.

My eldest (9) seemed to enjoy it, he clapped for almost 2 hours. :shock: :D

Well worth the effort.

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Re: ANZAC day

Post by Splod » Sun Apr 25, 2010 6:21 pm

Two hours? Long parade...

We were the only reserve unit to parade as we're the only ones with money left to still parade. I was in the front row of the band, with only our Drum Major, 2 student flag bearers and a half dozen light horse re-enactors in front of me. So pretty much right up front.
My shoulders were so sore come the end of it thanks to that bloody side drum. It rained on us, the wind picked up and then we got sun burnt. I love Tassie :)
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Re: ANZAC day

Post by Dropbear » Sun Apr 25, 2010 8:26 pm

Splod wrote:Two hours? Long parade...

We were the only reserve unit to parade as we're the only ones with money left to still parade.
And to make this worse... you get paid more as a band member than any other corp member :cry:

Musicians are on a high pay level... even a PTE gets paid more than I do as an NCO!!!!

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Re: ANZAC day

Post by Splod » Sun Apr 25, 2010 8:28 pm

Uha... Nice pay scale that :)

I'm not going to complain, I'm on the right side of it ;)
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Re: ANZAC day

Post by Bluewillow » Mon Apr 26, 2010 10:32 am

Had a great day out, a long day for our band though, played four times yesterday, including two street marches.

we had 31 playing members yesterday, our largest street march ever, 1 Bass (me), four sides, four tenors, drum major, two standard bearers, and rest were pipers!

Goulburn Dawn service
Goulburn War Cemetery Service
Goulburn street march
then Taralga Street march

then twice at two different pubs which really don't count, except for the free drinks that it brings

cheers
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Re: ANZAC day

Post by Incitatus » Mon Apr 26, 2010 3:33 pm

I drove up to Balmain yesterday to buy the ANZAC Day papers. I found the place packed with yuppies pushing their big, expensive strollers, jostling three deep in the ersatz Italian coffee shop where you can pay top dollar to sit on the footpath on plastic milk crates and eat German pastries. The pub was also overflowing, with a bellowing crowd, playing two up. Some of the drunken surfie boys gambling in designer board shorts had Australian flags wrapped around their shoulders. They roared and howled as the pennies spun.

The old war memorial across the road was deserted by this time, littered with already fading flowers. A hand written card on one wreath said, "In memory of my dad and his brothers. Coloured soldiers who fought for their country". Some Primary school kids had made a posy of paper red poppies. I wondered what they thought it meant.

On the way back to the car, I passed an old man in an immaculate, pressed overcoat and suit, heading home alone.

The rise of jingoism in Australia on ANZAC Day may be related to the dying off of the old blokes who really knew what war meant. My late uncle declined to march on ANZAC day for fifty years because he said he didn't want to glorify war. Both my grandfathers fought in the trenches on the western front in World War One and had a pretty good idea of what militarism led to. My father refused to enlist in the just war against Japan, because he remembered how his father had been neglected when he came back to Australia, lungs wrecked by mustard gas.
But these wise old blokes are gone now, leaving ANZAC day to the myth makers and their ignorant, braying children. These people proclaim Australia joined wars to fight to win our freedom. They ignore the fact that freedoms had really been won by a century of reformists; anti-slavers, trades unionists, liberal parliamentarians, suffragettes and ironically, even the odd communist. Sadly the military were too often on the other side in this struggle. You might recall that the Light Horse won its Emu feather battle honour by helping break the shearers' strike; a move which led directly to the formation of the Australian Labor Party. The shearers did hard labour. The military got a feather in its hat.

So now we have a new ANZAC day where toddlers wear the medals won in forgotten battles in distant wars. They say its to remember the fallen. But I reckon its to forget the lessons of history.

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Re: ANZAC day

Post by Admin Fella » Mon Apr 26, 2010 6:28 pm

Part of the thoughts i had yesterday. Namely that the day is built around the WWI & WWII blokes, what will it mean when they are no longer marching????

I am fully entitled to march on the day, but still think that my experiences bear nothing to those fellas. It is just not the same.

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