British 23rd foot Regiment Colours N.America 1775-1783

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British 23rd foot Regiment Colours N.America 1775-1783

Post by nevermore » Sat Oct 04, 2014 7:53 pm

British 23rd foot Regiment Colours N.America 1775-1783

The 23rd Regiment of Foot arrived in New York in June of 1773
and were moved to Boston under the command of General Gage in 1774.
In April of 1775, the regiment took part in the Battles of Lexington and Concord.
On June 16, 1775, the Grenadier and Light Infantry companies of the 23rd
participated in the Battle of Bunker Hill. In 1776, during the battles for New York,
the regiment saw action at Long Island, Brooklyn Heights, Harlem Heights, White
Plains, and the capture of Fort Washington. In 1777, the regiment took part in the
battles of Brandywine Creek, Germantown, and the capture of Philadelphia.
During the late summer and early fall of 1778, the Royal Welch Fusiliers served
as marines aboard the fleet during several engagements with the French fleet.
Towards the end of that year, they were sent south, arriving in Charleston.
South Carolina in early 1780, participating in the siege of the city, and later
that year taking part in the Battle of Camden on August 16th. Working their
way back north, the 23rd participated in the Battle of Guilford Court House
on March 15, 1781. The regiment was present during the Siege of Yorktown
and the British surrender which followed on October 19th, 1781. During the
siege; however, the Royal Welch Fusiliers held their redoubt against
overwhelming odds, and gained the respect of the American Army.
This redoubt exists today at the Yorktown Battlefield National Park;
named the Fusilier's Redoubt, in honor of the 23rd Regiment of Foot.

23rd regiment

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At the Virginia convention held May, 1775, in Richmond, the colony was divided into 16 districts and each district instructed to raise the discipline a battalion of men "to march at a minute's notice". Culpeper, Fauquier, and Orange, forming one district, raised a cadre of 350 men called the Culpeper Minute Men. Organized July 17, 1775, under a large oak tree in "Clayton's old field" (later known as Catalpa Farm), the Minute Men took part in the Battle of Great Bridge, the first Revolutionary battle on Virginia soil. The Culpeper Minute Men flag is inscribed with the words, "Liberty or Death" and "Don't Tread on Me".

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Sheets 03 of N.American British flags during the years 1775-1783 and Patriot flags are now available on the web site at http://www.victorian-steel.com/

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