Something to Ponder!

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saltykov
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Something to Ponder!

Postby saltykov » Sun May 03, 2009 12:05 pm

Your cell phone is in your pocket.
He clutches the cross hanging on his chain next to his dog tags.

You talk trash about your 'buddies' that aren't with you.
He knows he may not see some of his buddies again.

You walk down the beach, staring at all the pretty girls.
He patrols the streets, searching for insurgents and terrorists.

You complain about how hot it is
He wears his heavy gear, not daring to take off his helmet to wipe his brow.

You go out to lunch, and complain because the restaurant got your order wrong.
He doesn't get to eat today.

Your maid makes your bed and washes your clothes.
He wears the same things for weeks, but makes sure his weapons are clean.

You go to the mall and get your hair redone.
He doesn't have time to brush his teeth today.

You're angry because your class ran 5 minutes over.
He's told he will be held over an extra 2 months.

You call your girlfriend and set a date for tonight.
He waits for the mail to see if there is a letter from home.

You hug and kiss your girlfriend, like you do everyday.
He holds his letter close and smells his love's perfume.

You roll your eyes as a baby cries.
He gets a letter with pictures of his new child, and wonders if they'll ever meet.

You criticize your government, and say that war never solves anything.
He sees the innocent tortured and killed by their own people and remembers why he is fighting.

You hear the jokes about the war, and make fun of men like him.
He hears the gunfire, bombs and screams of the wounded.

You see only what the media wants you to see.
He sees the broken bodies lying around him.

You are asked to go to the store by your parents. You don't.
He does exactly what he is told even if it puts his life in danger.

You stay at home and watch TV.
He takes whatever time he is given to call, write home, sleep, and eat.

You crawl into your soft bed, with down pillows, and get comfortable.
He tries to sleep but gets woken by mortars and helicopters all night long.
Regards

General Pyotr Semyonovich Saltykov

Cardinal Biggles

Re: Something to Ponder!

Postby Cardinal Biggles » Sun May 03, 2009 12:14 pm

pondered , life's ironies, Clauswitz had it right..

Cardinal Biggles

Re: Something to Ponder!

Postby Cardinal Biggles » Sun May 03, 2009 12:36 pm

did you write this?

saltykov
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Re: Something to Ponder!

Postby saltykov » Mon May 04, 2009 9:07 am

Bishop Biggles wrote:did you write this?

I am not that bright Bishop :( wish I was. A friend sent it to me and I thought it was worth sharing. I hope others thought it as thought provoking as I did, especially as an old bush basher myself.
Regards

General Pyotr Semyonovich Saltykov

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Cacadores
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Re: Something to Ponder!

Postby Cacadores » Thu May 14, 2009 11:27 am

Nicely written.

On the other hand, to understand the soldier, it helps to remember that modern war is also fun and exciting - a fact that civvies often feel very uncomfortable with. So much so that this aspect of the professional soldier's life in a war zone is often suppressed.

After all, depressing descriptions make us feel better about not being there, rather than necessarily describing how it feels for a squaddie, although I would be interested if a squaddie wrote that or a civvy. I suspect a civvy.

Here's an older soldier's point of view:

'My life was pretty rubbish.

Image

''There was very little satisfaction and lots of work that seemingly went nowhere. I would be in the office by 8am. Initially it wasn't too bad. I would be gone by 7pm. But then I switched teams and it was 11pm. You go home, shower, go to bed and in the morning it all happens again.' He felt he was 'becoming a grey man'. He was haunted by the example of one of his collegues, only a few years older, who had a wife and child and was saddled with the huge mortgage needed to buy the sort of house his status demanded. 'He was a beaten man'. I thought to myself, I need to change tack here. I need to do something interesting.''

Hugo Farmer, ex-City financier, explaining how he came to be in Basra with the Paras.

There are more stories about the rush of battle here:

http://ilovewargameing.21.forumer.com/v ... 9643#39643


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