Gormenghast Trilogy

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Greywolf

Gormenghast Trilogy

Post by Greywolf » Mon Apr 13, 2009 7:40 pm

Anyone out there read the Gormenghast trilogy by Mervyn Peake ? Read it a couple of times now,sort of (very sort of) like alternate world Dickens.

Cardinal Biggles

Re: Gormenghast Trilogy

Post by Cardinal Biggles » Mon Apr 13, 2009 7:41 pm

Could never quite get my head a round it..

Greywolf

Re: Gormenghast Trilogy

Post by Greywolf » Mon Apr 13, 2009 7:43 pm

You surprise me :shock: :shock:

Cardinal Biggles

Re: Gormenghast Trilogy

Post by Cardinal Biggles » Mon Apr 13, 2009 8:39 pm

I can be quite conservative in my reading at times...could never read Italo Calvino either, or Russell Hoban and have little time or patience with anything post modern..

starkadder

Re: Gormenghast Trilogy

Post by starkadder » Mon Apr 13, 2009 9:00 pm

greywolf wrote:Anyone out there read the Gormenghast trilogy by Mervyn Peake ? Read it a couple of times now,sort of (very sort of) like alternate world Dickens.
Yep. I've read everything of Peake's I could find including Letters from a Lost Uncle which sparked my interest in Antarctica. Well a bit. Douglas Mawson really did it for me. But the turtle was great.

I had the great pleasure of destroying my niece's interest in JK Rowling by introducing her to the Gormenghast trilogy. She lives in London now and as late as fortnight ago we chatted about Peake. And Rowling is NOWHERE.

Sadly for the Kardinal I also love Italo Calvino. Invisible Cities is an amazing work. Then again I really like 20th Century Italian writing (with the exception of Eco who is a wanker). You should try Giorgio Bassani or Giovanni de Lampedusa. For one of the most wrenching reads of your life I recommend Primo Levi's If this is a Man. It should and will change your life. Seriously.

So many things to read.

Greywolf

Re: Gormenghast Trilogy

Post by Greywolf » Mon Apr 13, 2009 9:55 pm

starkadder wrote:
greywolf wrote:Anyone out there read the Gormenghast trilogy by Mervyn Peake ? Read it a couple of times now,sort of (very sort of) like alternate world Dickens.
Yep. I've read everything of Peake's I could find including Letters from a Lost Uncle which sparked my interest in Antarctica. Well a bit. Douglas Mawson really did it for me. But the turtle was great.

I had the great pleasure of destroying my niece's interest in JK Rowling by introducing her to the Gormenghast trilogy. She lives in London now and as late as fortnight ago we chatted about Peake. And Rowling is NOWHERE.

Sadly for the Kardinal I also love Italo Calvino. Invisible Cities is an amazing work. Then again I really like 20th Century Italian writing (with the exception of Eco who is a wanker). You should try Giorgio Bassani or Giovanni de Lampedusa. For one of the most wrenching reads of your life I recommend Primo Levi's If this is a Man. It should and will change your life. Seriously.

So many things to read.

I've actually read de Lampedusas The Leopard and read the Primo Levi book so long ago I have pretty much forgotten it. Good work with the niece :D ,stab in the dark ,do you like Conrad as well ? When I first read the Heart of Darkness I was amazed,his other stuff is good too,English wasn't even his second language, brilliant.


So many things to read, I concur,back to Duggan.

Cardinal Biggles

Re: Gormenghast Trilogy

Post by Cardinal Biggles » Mon Apr 13, 2009 10:27 pm

strangely I like Eco but Primo Levi doesn't get me anywhere..And I do like Conrad.Heart of Darkness, my love of it survived several years of teaching it to year 11, they used to great it with cries of , "not many pages , great..", sad really..that ,Hamlet, and Wilfrid Owen used to leave them gasping for more..

Cardinal Biggles

Re: Gormenghast Trilogy

Post by Cardinal Biggles » Mon Apr 13, 2009 10:28 pm

Now DH Lawrence, whoever went down The Rainbow & Women in Love path...I am actually organising a list of novels that affected my World view for Facebook so this is a bit stimulating

Greywolf

Re: Gormenghast Trilogy

Post by Greywolf » Tue Apr 14, 2009 5:47 pm

Glad you like Conrad,what about those Brontes? I like them,not keen on the Austen woman except Persuasion.

starkadder

Re: Gormenghast Trilogy

Post by starkadder » Tue Apr 14, 2009 6:21 pm

Oooh, mentioning Jane Austen on a miniatures forum. Brave man indeed, particularly with the Bronte multiplier.

Now you must say the magic words thrice: Duggan, Hammett and Chandler. Then throw a copy of a John Grisham novel over your left shoulder and yell at the top of your voice "George Eliot was not a man".

Try not to hit any crockery with the Grisham.

Cardinal Biggles

Re: Gormenghast Trilogy

Post by Cardinal Biggles » Tue Apr 14, 2009 6:43 pm

George Eliot, and his brother Tom , actually are Generals in Grand Prydain

Greywolf

Re: Gormenghast Trilogy

Post by Greywolf » Tue Apr 14, 2009 9:45 pm

Cardinal Biggles wrote:George Eliot, and his brother Tom , actually are Generals in Grand Prydain
A case of the Princess Stephanies? Don't have any Grisham,too many Orwells,Waughs and Greenes for him. My favourite tosh is Dan Abnett,he of the Tanith 1st and Only etc.

starkadder

Re: Gormenghast Trilogy

Post by starkadder » Tue Apr 14, 2009 10:15 pm

I do not know this Abnett person but it sounds dreadful. Anything with numbers as a suffix always sounds dreadful.

A Thirlmere friend of mine has a collection of works by someone called Robert Jordan. Placed one on top of the other they are as tall as her. They look ghastly and I am happily judging them by their covers as that's what their publicists would seem to want. And they all seem to have numbers as suffixes. I blame word-processors and the decline of the power of editors.

The whole damned thing would appear to be longer than the Mahabharata. And that's about everything! Has some great toy soldier options in it as well.

Waugh is great, of course. Orwell and Greene always amusing. Such a light comic touch the old Orwell. A real japester. My favourite all-time comic novel is Stella Gibbon's Cold Comfort Farm. (The big clue is my screen-name). Arturo Perez-Reverte is always interesting. And Alan Furst who is consistently wonderful in his stories of the early war.

Mind you, I'm having a lot of fun rereading The Wizard of Oz, the real L Frank Baum and not the marketing pastiche currently doing the rounds ("Wicked" etc).

However my all-time favourite reading is wine labels. Simple straightforward, strong sense of place and time and you're always left emotional at the end.

Greywolf

Re: Gormenghast Trilogy

Post by Greywolf » Wed Apr 15, 2009 4:03 pm

Comic novels? Lord Dunsany is good and I always enjoy the Mitfords(sewer!). And there is always Tom Sharpe,ah wasted days in 6th form.Then there is that naughty Fanny Hill and for outright bonkyness I do like Gogol.

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